Seventy-two years ago today, thousands of U.S. Marines landed on the island of Iwo Jima, a tiny Pacific atoll about 760 miles from mainland Japan. Feb. 19, 1945, was the first day of an intense, 36-day battle that became one of the major turning points in World War II.

While the iconic image of six Marines raising an American flag atop Mount Suribachi is one of the most famous photos ever captured, you won’t find it in this gallery. Here are 11 lesser-known photos from the famous battle.

Photo credit Marine Corps photo

This photo by Marine Pfc. Bob Campbell shows AP photographer Joe Rosenthal capturing Marines posing with the famous flag at the top of Mount Suribachi during the Battle of Iwo Jima.

Photo credit National Archives photo

An Assault flame-thrower group of the 4th Marine Division studies a relief map of Iwo Jima while enroute. First Lieutenant Joseph E. Lo Prete, of Brooklyn, N.Y., presides.

Photo credit National Archives photo

A Marine machine gunner fires at Japanese positions in support of an American advance on Iwo Jima.

Photo credit National Archives photo

Riflemen lead the way as flame throwing Marines of the 5th Division, crouched with the weight of their weapons, move up to work on a concentration of Japanese pillboxes.

Photo credit National Archives photo

A wave of Marines is organized after reaching the Iwo beachhead and preparations are made for the push inland.

Photo credit National Archives photo

Marines burrow in the volcanic sand of the Iwo beach, as their comrades unload supplies and equipment from landing vessels despite the hail of fire from enemy positions on Mount Suribachi in the background.

Photo credit National Archives photo

Burdened with heavy packs and equipment Marine communicators dash for cover during the inland drive from the Iwo beachhead.

Photo credit National Archives photo

Members of a Marine platoon halt to consult a map on Motoyama airfield number two.

Photo credit National Archives photo

A Marine 37-mm gun crew blasts Japanese positions on the slopes of Iwo’s Mount Suribachi from which the enemy had poured a withering fire on the beachhead.

Photo credit National Archives photo

Section chief, Marine Private First Class R. F. Callahan, calls for fire and another 155-mm shell is hurled into a Japanese position.

Photo credit National Archives photo

This concrete Japanese shelter on Iwo Jima suffered a direct artillery hit, but the standing portions were used as aid stations for Marines wounded in the front lines fighting.